Archive for September, 2014

Doug at Wholey’s Sunday 11am 9/28/14 for a free cooking/gardening demo

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

Join me at Wholey's this Sunday. I'll cook some swordfish for you and we'll talk gardening.

Join me at Wholey’s this Sunday. I’ll cook some swordfish for you and we’ll talk gardening.


I’m very excited to announce that I’ll be appearing monthly at Wholey’s in the Strip. This Sunday 9/28/24 I’ll be there at 11 a.m. cooking swordfish with a Wholey’s family recipe and talking about fall planting. I’ll be serving you some of the swordfish too.
There’s plenty of free parking on Sundays and we’re going to have a lot of fun.

Making Mums Last as seen on KDKA’s Pittsburgh Today Live

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

Choosing mums which are just budding will make them last longer this season. Photo by Doug Oster

Choosing mums which are just budding will make them last longer this season. Photo by Doug Oster


The hazy world of “hardy mums” causes both confusion an consternation for gardeners. “Why don’t they come back,” I’m often asked.

First, lets talk hardy. Some mums sold as hardy mums aren’t, others are. That’s easy, right? I always buy mine from a good nursery where the good folks there will know the variety and if it’s actually bred to overwinter in our climate.

Bet even though a mum is tough enough to make it through the winter, there’s only a 50 percent chance it will.

Here’s how mums are forced to bloom in the fall. Growers pinch back the buds at least two times so the plant will be filled with flowers now. Since the plant has used so much energy to produce all those flowers, it’s usually just too tired to get established in the ground.

Here are a few tips to get the most out of your mums and attempt to get them to winter over.

Always buy from a place you trust. A good grower will never let the plants dry out and starting with a healthy plant makes all the difference in the world.

Pick plants that are still budded tight and not already flowering. You can usually get a good idea of what the color and flower type will be by looking and the plant tag and other blooming plants nearby.

Improve the soil with compost to make the plants happy. Buying a bag or two of good compost will go a long way to giving the mums everything they need.

Keep the plant watered and deadhead the first flush of blooms. When the mum has bloomed once, there should be more buds ready to bloom. Remove the spent flowers and the plant should bloom again.

At the end of the season, don’t cut back the dying branches. There’s research showing leaving the plant alone and cutting back in the spring is better for over wintering.

Mums are a big part of our fall gardens, enjoy the blooms now and cross your fingers for the plant to return in the spring.